Women in Bodysuit

Women's Health Day

Early detection saves lives

 IS NOW OFFERING WOMEN'S HEALTH DAYS IN EFFORT TO
RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT CERVICAL AND OVARIAN CANCER 

2,800

1,950

1,350

1 in 168

Canadian women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every year.
An estimated 1,950 will die from ovarian cancer
An estimated 1,350 Canadian women will be diagnosed with cervical cancer in 2020.
1 in 168 women is expected to develop cervical cancer during her lifetime, and 1 in 478 will die of it.
What is HPV and how can I get it?
HPV or human papillomavirus is a group of more than 150
related viruses, known as HPV types. Some HPV types can
lead to cancer and are usually referred to as high-risk HPV
types or HrHPV. Men and women can get cancer of mouth /
throat, and anus / rectum caused by HPV infections. Men can
also get penile HPV cancer. In women, HPV infections are
the primary cause cervical, vaginal, and vulvar HPV cancers.
HPV is transmitted through intimate skin-to-skin contact and
the most common way to contract this infection is through
sexual intercourse. You can get HPV by having vaginal,
anal, or oral sex with someone who has the virus. HPV is
so common that nearly 9 out of 10 men and women get it at
some point in their lives. HPV can be passed even when an
infected person has no signs or symptoms. You can develop
symptoms years after being infected, making it hard to know
when you first became infected.
For women, HPV can remain undetected in your cervical
cells for a long period of time without any warning signs or
symptoms. Fortunately, most women are able to fight off this
infection before it causes any health issues. It’s only when
the high-risk HPV types don’t go away that abnormal cervical
cells can develop.
Life Labs
OTHER WOMEN'S HEALTH PROVIDERS IN DAWSON CREEK 

With limited options available to the conventional medical system, Oak Clinic offers alternatives to normalize hormonal imbalances influencing conditions such as: PMS, endometriosis, PCOS, fibrocystic breasts, acne, and menopausal symptoms.

$6M

to date has been allocated to research by Ovarian Cancer Canada.
AboutOC-DiseaseBasics-new-min.jpg

Ovarian Cancer Disease Basics

 

"The body is made up of many types of cells that grow and divide in a controlled way to produce more cells as they are needed to keep the body healthy. When cells become old or damaged, they die and are replaced with new cells.
 
Sometimes the genetic material (DNA) of a cell becomes damaged or changed, producing mutations that affect normal cell growth and division; cells do not die when they should and new cells form when the body does not need them. The extra cells may form a mass of tissue called a tumour.
 
Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissue in the body."

 

National Cancer Institute